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Upcoming Events

Apr 15, 2014
ʺPlayin’ Race: Black Women Performing Race Play," Ariane Cruz
Resident Scholars and Artists Lecture Series
Apr 22, 2014
ʺMutual Comprehension and Hybrid Identities in the Tehran Bazaar: Reflections on Interviews and Interlocutors in Contemporary Iran,ʺ Arang Keshavarzian
Cities: Tehran Series
View All Upcoming Events and Details

Global Midwest

Recently we had the pleasure of announcing our membership in Humanities Without Walls, the innovative 15-member Mellon-funded consortium of humanities institutes throughout the Big Ten, plus the University of Chicago, Notre Dame, and the University of Illinois-Chicago. We are writing once again to solicit proposals for the first HWW initiative, “The Global Midwest.

Each HWW member institute now has $30,000 of seed money to sponsor a project, or an array of projects, that contribute to the understanding of the Midwest in a global perspective. Any and all proposals are welcome; initiatives can concentrate on (for example) the history of immigration in our area, the persistence of “heritage languages” in Pennsylvania, the place of Pennsylvanian labor, agriculture, and industry in the context of global commerce, or the changing landscape of Pennsylvania higher education as a locus for international students.

Funds will be available immediately once the awards are made. These funds are intended to support the development of collaborative proposals for two additional competitions, each of which will draw on $750,000 in consortium funds. Deadlines for these funding rounds are tentatively set for October 2014 and October 2015.

We are moving the deadline for proposals back to Monday, April 14, 2014.

Proposal Guidelines

Being Humans

What does it mean, and what has it meant, to be human? What might "the human" mean in the foreseeable and unforeseeable future? These are the questions that animate the arts and humanities– and that will define the work of Penn State's Institute for the Arts and Humanities. Beginning in 2010-11, the Institute will offer programming devoted to exploring the question of "the human" from all angles.

For artists and humanists, these are extraordinary times: as the fate of our planet hangs in the balance, our sense of "the human" is undergoing remarkable challenges and transformations. How should we understand our relation to animal cognition, to artificial intelligence, to the biosphere, to disability, to prostheses, to genetics? What role can we imagine for the arts and humanities in the era of the Anthropocene, when the distinction between culture and nature is being eroded by human cultures that are transforming nature? Can we imagine a form of humanism in which the boundaries of the human are unclear and unstable? Artists, performers, and humanists must be central to these debates– and to every deliberation of what it means to be human.

For artists and humanists, these are extraordinary times: as the fate of our planet hangs in the balance, our sense of "the human" is undergoing remarkable challenges and transformations. How should we understand our relation to animal cognition, to artificial intelligence, to the biosphere, to disability, to prostheses, to genetics? What role can we imagine for the arts and humanities in the era of the Anthropocene, when the distinction between culture and nature is being eroded by human cultures that are transforming nature? Can we imagine a form of humanism in which the boundaries of the human are unclear and unstable? Artists, performers, and humanists must be central to these debates– and to every deliberation of what it means to be human.