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2013-2014

Sep 18, 2013
3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. – Ihlseng Cottage
IAH Open House

Stop by and see what the Institure for Arts and Humanities is all about.

Refreshments will be provided.

Sep 26, 2013
7:00 p.m. – Alumni Lounge, Nittany Lion Inn
Philosophical Prepositions: Ecotechnics à où Digital Exhibition

Timothy Murray, Director, Society for the Humanities, Cornell University. Professor of Comparative Literature and English. Curator, Rose Goldsen Archive of New Media Studies

This talk situates the thought of French philosopher, Jean-Luc Nancy, within approaches to philosophy and art that reflect on the impact of technology in the digital world. Departing from his premise that "To Philosophize is to Think Exposition," the presentation contrasts Nancy's position with those of Derrida, Deleuze, and Lyotard. Nancy positions exhibition in paradoxical contrast to conventional systems of ocular perspective through which the subject has been thought conventionally to be captured in presence. Contrasting the "techno-logie" of Occidental theories of the apparatus to the "eco-technics" whose exhibitional activitivites of touch, proximity, and prepositionality shake and disturb predetermined assumptions about the culture of technology and its relation to art and philosophy. Nancy's theorizations of technology and art will be read in parallel with an intorduction to Ryoji Ikeda’s 2011 colossal screenic installation, “The Transfinite,” that filled the vast Wade Thompson Drill Hall of The Armory in New York City.

Oct 2, 2013
7:00 p.m. – Alumni Lounge, Nittany Lion Inn
From "Golden Age" to "Decadence": Women on the Lalehzar District Stage in Pre-Revolutionary Tehran
Part of the "Cities: Tehran" Lecture Series

Ida Meftahi, IAH 2013/14 Post-doctoral Fellow

Some called Lalehzar Street “Tehran’s Champs-Élysées,” linking its creation to the Qajar ruler Nasir Al-Din Shah’s (1831–96) trips to France, while others compared it to the Quartier Latin district of Paris. For about four decades, “the street” was the main venue for the modernist cultural endeavours of the nationalist art scene, where several active amphitheatres resided next to printing houses and cinemas, as well as restaurants and cafés. The 1953 coup d'état, however, marks the demise of Lalehzar in most historical narratives of Iranian theatre, when dancers replaced actors, and comedy and juggling—instead of high art and “real” theatre—permeated the scene. This presentation explores the notions of “golden age” and “decadence” attributed to Lalehzar, vis-à-vis the (bio-) economy of female performers and the socio-political context of culture in pre-revolutionary Tehran.

Oct 3, 2013
4:00 p.m. , 7:00 p.m. , 10:00 p.m. – The State Theatre
Uncanny October Film: Spirited Away (2001)

Rated PG, 125 min. Directed by Hayao Miyazaki.

This beautiful Japanese anime film features a 10-year old girl who unexpectedly finds herself in a world ruled by ancient ghosts, spirits, and witches. This version is voiced in English.

These film viewings will be free and open to the public

Oct 7, 2013
4:00 p.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
Uncanny October Talk: Renfield's Syndrome – Or How I (Unintentionally) Created a Monster

Richard Noll

Any vampire knows that Renfield's Syndrome is a real psychiatric condition... or is it? For the first time ever, the creator of Renfield's Syndrome emerges from his crypt to tell the story of how a fang-in-cheek parody of a DSM mental disorder became a cultural phenomenon.

Oct 9, 2013
7:00 p.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
Uncanny October Film: Alice (1988)

Not rated, 86 min. Directed by Jan Svankmajer

A film made for children... perhaps? This dark, surrealist interpretation of Lewis Caroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland combines live action with stop-motion animation. Czech language with English subtitles; parents may want to pre-screen content for young audiences.

Oct 12, 2013
11:00 a.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
Uncanny October Film: Alice (1988)

Not rated, 86 min. Directed by Jan Svankmajer

Second Viewing

Oct 9, 2013
7:00 p.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
Uncanny October Film: Alice (1988)

Not rated, 86 min. Directed by Jan Svankmajer

A film made for children... perhaps? This dark, surrealist interpretation of Lewis Caroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland combines live action with stop-motion animation. Czech language with English subtitles; parents may want to pre-screen content for young audiences.

Oct 12, 2013
11:00 a.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
Uncanny October Film: Alice (1988)

Not rated, 86 min. Directed by Jan Svankmajer

Second Viewing

Oct 15, 2013
7:30 p.m. – Eisenhower Auditorium
An Evening with Patti Smith - Medal Ceremony

The IAH is pleased to announce that the recipient of the 2013 Medal for Distinguished Achievement will be Patti Smith. After a brief ceremony to present her with the IAH Medal, Ms. Smith will offer a solo live performance of her music.

General Admission: $35, PSU Students (U. Park): $15
For Tickets, please call 1-800-ARTS-TIX or visit the PSU Arts Ticket Center.

Oct 16, 2013
7:00 p.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
Uncanny October Film: Rare Exports: A Christmas Tale (2010)

Rated R, 84 min. Directed by Jalmari Helander

It's Christmas time, and Santa Claus is coming to town. But two Finnish boys learn that the true meaning of Christmas is best left buried. You'll never look at Saint Nick the same way again.

Oct 17, 2013
7:00 p.m. – Schwab Auditorium
Uncanny October Film Screening and Performance: Gravity was Everywhere Back Then (Brent Green, 2010)

Brent Green and Gravity 7

A stunning film exploring poignantly beautiful themes of love and loss, Gravity Was Everywhere Back Then is based on the true story of Leonard Wood, a hardware store clerk who rebuilt his house as a “healing machine” for his dying wife, Mary, pursuing the project even years after her death. In making the film, Green painstakingly rebuilt Wood’s then-demolished house, based on the plans Wood had left behind after his own death.

This event will feature live musical and spoken accompaniment by Brent Green and Gravity 7.
The event is free and open to the public.

Oct 19, 2013
11:00 a.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
Uncanny October Film: Rare Exports: A Christmas Tale (2010)

Rated R, 84 min. Directed by Jalmari Helander

Second Viewing

Oct 21, 2013
12:00 p.m. – 127 Moore Building
Resident Scholars and Artists Lecture Series
“The News at the Ends of the Earth:Oceanic Studies and the Print Cultureof Polar Exploration.ʺ

Hester Blum

Many Anglo-American polar expeditions of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries brought an unusual piece of nautical equipment aboard ship: a printing press. With such presses, polar-voyaging sailors wrote and printed newspapers, broadsides, and other reading matter beyond the Arctic and Antarctic Circles. Hester Blum's research examines these polar periodicals and the unexpected role coterie or private publishing played in polar exploration in order to think more broadly about the emerging field of oceanic studies.

Light lunch at 11:45 a.m. Presentation starts promptly at 12:00 p.m.

Oct 23, 2013
7:00 p.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
Uncanny October Film: Trouble Every Day (2001)

Not rated, 101 min. Directed by Claire Denis

Sex and death have never been so close. Starring Vincent Gallo and Béatrice Dalle, this French horror film offers a new, terrifying spin on the vampire genre, exploring themes of existentialism, eroticism, and gender through the story of an American couple honeymooning in Paris.

Oct 24, 2013
7:00 p.m. – Borland Building, Room 112
The War of the Worlds, Broadcast of 1938: A Performance and Roundtable Discussion

Panelists will include: Mary Beth Oliver (Co-Director of the Media Effects Research Laboratory and Distinguished Professor of Media Studies, Penn State College of Communications), Matthew McAllister (Professor of Media Studies, Penn State College of Communications), and Greg Eghigian (Associate Professor of Modern History, Penn State Department of History).

To celebrate the 75th anniversary of the original radio performance of The War of the Worlds by Orson Welles and the Mercury Theater, we will listen to the broadcast and discuss its impact on American society, UFO belief, the media, and social science.

Oct 27, 2013
12:30 p.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
Uncanny October Film: Trouble Every Day (2001)

Not rated, 101 min. Directed by Claire Denis

This event has been canceled.

Oct 30, 2013
7:00 p.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
Uncanny October Film: The Shining (1980)

Rated R, 146 min. Directed by Stanley Kubrick

This 1980 psychological horror film, based on a Stephen King novel, features a family living in an isolated Colorado hotel over the winter. The father slowly descends into a sinister madness much like the former hotel caretaker.

Nov 4, 2013
12:00 p.m. – 127 Moore Building
Resident Scholars and Artists Lecture Series

“Pennsylvania Farming: a History in Landscapes”
Sally McMurry

Sally McMurry's research tells the story of Pennsylvania farming through its historic barns, farmhouses, outbuildings, and landscape features. Stately barns contribute to the analysis, but rough and lowly chicken coops, migrant worker quarters, and privies claim their place too. McMurry traces agricultural landscapes throughout the state as they evolved from the colonial period to the present.

Light lunch at 11:45 a.m. Presentation starts promptly at 12:00 p.m.

Nov 6, 2013
4:00 p.m. – Mann Assembly Room, Paterno Library
"An Instrument Infinitely More Wonderful Than Television"

John Modern

Modern earned his bachelor's in religion from Princeton University in 1993, his master's in comparative religion from Miami University of Ohio (1996) and his Ph.D. in religious studies from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 2003. Modern teaches classes in American religious history, literature, technology, and aesthetics. His work has appeared in Method & Theory in the Study of Religion, Journal of the American Academy of Religion, Church History, and Religion. He is the author of The Bop Apocalypse: The Religious Visions of Kerouac, Ginsberg, and Burroughs (University of Illinois Press, 2001) and Secularism in Antebellum America (University of Chicago Press, 2011). Modern's research has been funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, and the Social Science Research Council.

Nov 11, 2013
12:00 p.m. – 127 Moore Building
Resident Scholars and Artists Lecture Series

"The Politics of Resentment"
Jeremy Engels

Jeremy Engels's research explores the history of resentment and its role in contemporary political discourse. From the early nineteenth century, when Jacksonian democracy drew its power from resentment against established Northeastern and Virginian elites, to the present moment of Tea Party activism, resentment has been mobilized to a wide variety of social agendas. This lecture illuminates the rhetorical and political contexts that have made these mobilizations possible.

Light lunch at 11:45 a.m. Presentation starts promptly at 12:00 p.m.

Nov 13, 2013
7:00 p.m. – John Bill Freeman Auditorium, HUB-Robeson Center

Film Screening: Persepolis
Part of the Cities: Tehran Series

Based on the acclaimed graphic novel. In 1970s Iran, young Marjane 'Marji' Satrapi watches with her family as a dream is fulfilled, and the hated Shah's repressive regime is overturned in the Iranian Revolution of 1979. However, as Marji grows up, she finds that the new Iran, now ruled by Islamic fundamentalists​, has become a repressive tyranny in its turn. As Marji dangerously refuses to remain silent at the injustices she witnesses, her parents send her abroad to Vienna for a better, safer life. However, this proves to be an unexpected challenge, as the young woman finds herself in a different culture, surrounded by abrasive characters and profound disappointments that deeply trouble her. When she returns to Iran, Marji finds that she can't really go home again-- and the young woman and her loving family must decide where she truly belongs.

This event is free and open to the public.

Nov 18, 2013
12:00 p.m. – 127 Moore Building
Resident Scholars and Artists Lecture Series

"Frackville, PA: Poems"
Julia SpicherKasdorf

Julia SpicherKasdorf's research visits small towns and rural communities not far from State College, where slick water hydraulic fracturing has been most extensive. SpicherKasdorf's collection of poems documents linguistic, emotional and environmental effects of fracking in Northern and Western Pennsylvania.

Light lunch at 11:45 a.m. Presentation starts promptly at 12:00 p.m.

Dec 2, 2013
12:00 p.m. – 127 Moore Building
Resident Scholars and Artists Lecture Series

“The Warlords: The Failed Republic and the Question of China’s Future, 1917-1957"
Kate Merkel-Hess

Kate Merkel-Hess's research addresses one of the crucial but understudied phenomena of modern China: the devolution of the new Chinese Republic, founded in 1912, into rule by regional, often partisan “warlords.” The battles between these men became representative of China’s chaotic present during the Republican period (1911-1949) and kept the question of China’s future at the forefront of both domestic and international discussions. By bringing together strands of historical research on modernization, gender, and political ideology, Merkel-Hess excavates the rich and confusing paths to China’s future that lay before those living in the “failed republic.”

Light lunch at 11:45 a.m. Presentation starts promptly at 12:00 p.m.

Dec 2, 2013
12:00 p.m. – 121 Borland Building
Resident Scholars and Artists Lecture Series

"Depicting the Father's Son: The Baptism of Adeodatus in the Church of the Augustinian Hermits in Padua"
Katie Guide

Light lunch at 11:45 a.m. Presentation starts promptly at 12:00 p.m.

Jan 28, 2014
Postponed to Feb 11, 2014
7:00 p.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
Cities: Tehran Series

"An Alternative Space: Grand Bazaar and Transition of Public Spaces in Tehran"
Babak Soleimani

The urban transformation of Tehran initiated in 1934 aimed, among other things, to restrict the cultural activities and public life of a traditional urban class in favor of a western-oriented elite. Particular urban settings have played a key role in the form of “alternative spaces” that enabled the marginalized social group to preserve the vitality of their lifestyle. The paper focuses on the Grand Bazaar of Tehran as the most significant alternative space for the traditional class in pre-revolutionary Iran.

Feb 20, 2014
4:00 p.m. – 102 Weaver
Society for the Study of Religion
ʺThomas Jefferson: Private Heresy vs. Civic Religionʺ

Wilson Moses
Paul Harvey and Gregg Roeber responding

More information will be available soon.

Feb 20, 2014
7:00 p.m. – 112 Borland
Cities: Tehran Series

ʺWhat a Spectacle:ʺ Cosmopolitan Tehran and Cinematic Imaginaries in the Twentieth Centuryʺ
Golbarg Rekabtalaei

The proliferation of public spaces such as streets, squares, plazas, theatres, guesthouses, and cinemas in Tehran were for the most part shaped by and for the congregation of diasporic groups. The introduction of cinema spaces in Tehran, combined with the cosmopolitan imaginations that they fostered, further prompted the construction of hybrid cosmopolitan modern subjects in early twentieth century Tehran.

Feb 25, 2014
4:00 p.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
"Birdlike Acts: Animal Imitation and the History of Environmental Sound Recording"

Craig Eley, IAH 2013/14 Post-doctoral Fellow

Long before it was technologically possible to make sound recordings in the field, a variety of musicians, vaudevillians, and other performers attempted to make audible the voices of the natural world. This talk examines how the representational frameworks of these imitative practices deeply influenced scientific and popular environmental sound recordings throughout the first half of the twentieth century.

Mar 4, 2014
7:00 p.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
Cities: Tehran Series

My Tehran for Sale (2009)
dir. Granaz Moussavi

Presented by Jonathan Brockopp and Ida Meftahi

Doors open at 6:30. Film running time is 96 mins.

Reception to follow, co-sponsored by Middle East Studies

My Tehran For Sale is an internationally acclaimed 2009 Australian-Iranian feature film written and directed by avant-garde poet-turned-filmmaker Granaz Moussavi. The film explores the underground art scene of contemporary Tehran, focusing on the life of a young actress who has been banned from her theater work. Struggling to pursue her passion in art as well as her secret lifestyle in a socially oppressed environment, Marzieh meets Iranian-born Saman at an underground rave; Saman offers her a way out of her country and the possibility of living without fear, and Marzieh has to make a decision about her identity– and her survival.

Mar 18, 2014
12:00 p.m. – 124 Sparks
Resident Scholars and Artists Lecture Series

ʺGet Big or Get Out: Nature, Food and Power in America, 1945-1995.ʺ
Bryan McDonald

This talk will examine the development of American policy towards food and agriculture between the end of World War II and the final years of the Cold War as food became a vital tool of foreign policy that was strategically deployed by the United States to promote peace and stability around the world.

Light lunch at 11:45 a.m. Presentation starts promptly at 12:00 p.m.

March 24, 2014
4:30 p.m. – 112 Kern

Society for the Study of Religion
Harshbarger Lecture in Religious Studies
ʺDid Paul's Letters influence the New Testament Gospels?ʺ

J. Albert Harrill, Ohio State University

More information will be available soon.

Mar 25, 2014
12:00 p.m. – 124 Sparks
Resident Scholars and Artists Lecture Series

"The European City as Shopping Arcade"
Daniel Purdy

The lecture will discuss how the preservation of historic city centers in Europe is organized around the creation of a unique shopping experience in which pedestrians are presented images from the past that combine leisure, upper class good taste, elegant sociability with the occasional recognition of tragic events. The lecture will examine how historic European cities become their own brand in a culture filled with competing consumer brands.

Light lunch at 11:45 a.m. Presentation starts promptly at 12:00 p.m.

Mar 27, 2014
7:00 p.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
Cities: Tehran Series

ʺAddressed to Tehran: The Making of an Urban Counterpublic.ʺ
Babak Elahi

This talk examines the relationship between Tehran as a virtual social network, and Tehran as inhabited urban space. I argue that the website tehranavenue.com, (unlike more nostalgic representations of Tehran in both digital and analog media) bridged the gap between the virtual city and its lived experience. Based on interviews with Tehran Avenue's creators and writers, I explore the ways in which the website used digital technology and local space to form a public sphere around art and culture, and, by extension, politics. Especially in the realm of art and art exhibitions, Tehran Avenue reconciled an imagined Tehran with its built environment, brought the digital into dialogue with the "real," and situated the transnational within the local. This also allowed for the formation of an "aesthetic sphere" that had an activist function.

Apr 1, 2014
12:00 p.m. – 124 Sparks
Resident Scholars and Artists Lecture Series

"Rethinking Almoravid Rule"
Janina Safran

"Rethinking Almoravid Rule" reconsiders the role of religious ideology in the foundation and rule of a Berber regime that claimed authority over the Far Maghrib (Morocco) and al-Andalus (Islamic Iberia) in the 11th and 12th centuries. A focus on politics and the negotiation of power between the ruler and the `ulama' suggests important continuities of rule that are often overlooked. Examination of contemporary legal-religious texts reveals contradictions in the narrative of Almoravid rule and offer insight into the contested interests and concerns of legal-religious authorities in this period.

Light lunch at 11:45 a.m. Presentation starts promptly at 12:00 p.m.

Apr 4-5, 2014
008 Mueller
The Imaginary Vistas Spring Symposium

The Social, the Surface, and the Superficial
with Heather Love, Caleb Smith, and Branka Arsic

Public Talk: Friday, April 4 - 4:00 pm
Salon: Saturday, April 5 - 10:00 am
Breakfast provided for all attending

Sponsored by:
Imaginary Vistas
The Penn State Philosophy Department
The Penn State Institute for Arts and Humanities
The Penn State English Department's Graduate Studies Office

Apr 8, 2014

Sound Science/Environment
co-sponsored by the Rock Ethics Institute, Social Science Research Institute and Department of Recreation, Parks, and Tourism Management

Sound/Science/Environment is a regional workshop and public symposium for researchers whose interests broadly engage with questions about sound in the built and non-built environment. Featured speakers include experts in music, psychology, history, communication, biology, and parks management. Please find more information, including the schedule and list of speakers, at our website: http://sites.psu.edu/soundscienceenvironment2014/

5:00 p.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
Keynote: Sound/Science/Environment Workshop
"Monitoring, Modelling, and Interpreting Sound Levels at Landscape Scales in U. S. National Parks”
Kurt Fristrup

The National Park Service has pursued a program of acoustical monitoring to inventory conditions in parks to measure the change in background sound levels due to noise and evaluate the costs of noise to wildlife and visitors. Acoustic data have been collected at over 300 sites within 73 parks. The NPS recently created a predictive map of sound levels throughout the contiguous U. S. by fitting geospatial data related to sound sources and propagation to the acoustic monitoring data. Through partnerships, the National Park Service has produced a standard for sound level measurement in parks and quiet rural areas, and sponsored studies of noise impacts to wildlife and visitor experience. Collectively, these efforts have substantially advanced the scientific understanding of the value of natural acoustic environments and provided support for evaluating the costs of noise.

Kurt Fristrup is the Branch Chief for Science and Technology in the Natural Sounds and Night Skies Division of Natural Resource Stewardship and Science, a directorate within the U. S. National Park Service. He has overseen monitoring of acoustical conditions at more than 300 sites in national parks and other protected natural areas, and has helped develop models that generalize those observations into predictions of sound levels throughout the continental U. S. Kurt received his undergraduate degree in Biomedical Engineering from U. C. San Diego, and his Ph. D. in Organismal and Evolutionary Biology from Harvard University.

Apr 10, 2014
4:00 p.m. – 102 Weaver

Society for the Study of Religion
ʺVirile Women and Girly Men: Gender and Saintly Bodies in Early Modern Europe"
Brad Bouley

In early modern Europe, all saints were supposed to act like men. Male leaders of the Counter Reformation such as Ignatius of Loyola or Carlo Borromeo were referred to in hyper-masculine, military terms. Female saints such as Teresa of Avila or Rose of Lima were praised for their virile behavior in facing adversity or encouraging believers. However, after death, gender ideals for saints changed. In the late Middle Ages, female saints like Chiara of Montefalco underwent posthumous dissection in an attempt to prove their sanctity. Female saints were supposed to have the signs of their election detectable in their very flesh. However, in the atmosphere of the Counter Reformation, this feminine standard expanded to include all prospective holy individuals. All male and female saints were dissected in the early modern period in an attempt to prove their holiness. This paper will explore the gendering of the holy corpse and the ways in which the ideal body was, surprisingly, one that conformed to a female model.

Apr 14, 2014
12:00 p.m. – 124 Sparks
Resident Scholars and Artists Lecture Series

"Playin’ Race: Black Women Performing Race Play"
Ariane Cruz

This talk exposes, but does not resolve, the paradoxes immanent in race play, BDSM practice that explicitly uses race to script power exchange and the dynamics of domination and submission. Drawing from the diverse lived experiences of Black women BDSMers, specifically professional black femdoms, I illuminate the multitude of contradictions operating in the practice, its encircling discourse, and its representation in contemporary American pornography.

Light lunch at 11:45 a.m. Presentation starts promptly at 12:00 p.m.

Apr 22, 2014
7:00 p.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
Cities: Tehran Series

ʺMutual Comprehension and Hybrid Identities in the Tehran Bazaar: Reflections on Interviews and Interlocutors in Contemporary Iranʺ
Arang Keshavarzian

This talk will reflect on extensive interviews and discussions with Tehranis, especially members of the mercantile community, or bazaaris. While my research project aimed at tracing the transformation of the Tehran Bazaar before, during, and after the 1979 revolution, many of my exchanges with people in and about the bazaar dwelled on what it meant to be an Iranian, American, and other real and perceived identities. These discussions were infused with attempts by both my interlocutors and myself to understand one another despite various different life trajectories and experiences. Ultimately, I will illustrate how these bazaaris actively participated in making our lives comprehensible by invoking their expectations, assumptions, and knowledge about me—my Iranian background, my upbringing in America, my education, my status as a young man, and other attributes they believed were critical. I will argue that this process of meaning-making and dialogue was not complete, certain, or uncritical for it acknowledged the pluralism of life and possibility of hybrid forms of being.

2012-2013

May 30, 2013
7:30 p.m. – 8 Mueller Lab
Fiction Reading: Steven Byler

Author of Searching for Intruders. Introduced by Ervin Beck, Goshen College.

Part of the After Identity: Mennonite/s Writing in North America symposium.

May 29, 2013
4:00 p.m. – Foster Auditorium inside the Pattee/Paterno Library
Film: Silent Light

Written and directed by Carlos Reygadas, 2007. Followed by a discussion moderated by Hildi Froese Tiessen, Conrad Grebel University College, University of Waterloo with Paul Tiessen, English and Film Studies, University of Waterloo and Henry Morello, Comparative Literature and Spanish, The Pennsylvania State University.

Part of the After Identity: Mennonite/s Writing in North America symposium.

May 28, 2013
7:30 p.m. – University Mennonite Church
Lecture: Seeking Places of Peace – Mennonites in North America

Royden Loewen, chair in Mennonite Studies and Professor of History, University of Winnipeg

Part of the After Identity: Mennonite/s Writing in North America symposium.

April 26, 2013
12:10 p.m. – Palmer Museum, Print Study Room
Phoenix Savage, artist-in-residence, Penn State School of Visual Art, and fellow, Institute for the Arts and Humanities

April 18, 2013
8:00 p.m. – Room 112, Kern Building
Four Tropes of The Federalist: What Meaning Do They Have For Us Today?
Sanford V. Levinson, the W. St. John Garwood and W. St. John Garwood, Jr. Centennial Chair at the University of Texas School of Law

Publius, the putative author of The Federalist, begins by justifying his enterprise through the rhetoric  of "reflection and choice" (Federalist 1), moves on to place the actions of the Constitution's drafters within the context of "exigency" or "crisis" (Federalist 40), and then emphasizes the desirability of "venerating" the new Constitution (Federalist 49).  At least two central questions suggest themselves and will be the subject of the lecture: First, is there a significant tension among the tropes of reflection, choice, crisis, and veneration, or can they be made to mesh with one another? Second, to what extent do we view Publius as writing to us today, and, if we view him as anything other than an historical artifact, do we view the arguments as ones that we should accept today?

April 18, 2013
7:30 p.m. – Eisenhower Auditorium
CMP Performance: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's The Magic Flute

Canada's premier Baroque opera/ballet company, Opera Atelier makes its Penn State debut in a heralded production of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's The Magic Flute. Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra, like Opera Atelier from Toronto, provides live musical accompaniment for the performance of Mozart's final and most beloved opera. The Magic Flute, a family-friendly tale of a prince out to rescue the daughter of a queen, is performed in English with English supertitles.

For more information and tickets, please see Opera Atelier on The CMP.

April 18, 2013
6:00 p.m. – Foster Auditorium inside the Pattee/Paterno Library
Jean-Pierre le Dantec presents "The Art of the Garden and the City: from the Baroque Period to Today"

Jean-Pierre le Dantec's visit made possible by the Department of Landscape Architecture, the Department of French and Francophone Studies, the Institute for the Arts and Humanities, and the Department of Art History.

April 16, 2013
7:30 p.m. – Schwab Auditorium
CMP Performance: Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra's House of Dreams

Journey to the meeting places of Baroque art and music. Using exquisite musicianship, gorgeous projected images, and inviting narration as your guides, venture through five European homes where works by Johann Sebastian Bach, George Frideric Handel, Antonio Vivaldi, and Marin Marais were played amid paintings by Johannes Vermeer, Canaletto, and Antoine Watteau.

For more information and tickets, please see Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra on The CMP.

April 16, 2013
2:30 p.m. – 110 Music Building I
CMP Interdisciplinary Lecture Series: Engaging the Spiritual in Beethoven
Robert S. Hatten, professor of music theory, University of Texas

Is it possible to theorize about the spiritual in music that does not have a particular text or program? Or must music theorists content themselves with explaining structure alone and giving tools for analysis that merely dissect form and label harmonic progressions? This talk examines the themes from two of Beethoven’s slow movements, the famous Adagio Cantabile from his Piano Sonata No. 8 in C minor, Op. 13, familiarly known as Pathétique, and the less famous but equally profound Largo con gran espressione from his Piano Sonata No. 4 in E-flat Major, Op. 7. The aim is to demonstrate how one might build upon all the analytical tools of traditional theory and incorporate new theories of musical gesture, topics, and tropes in order to interpret a deeper kind of expressive meaning in music — namely, that which we might call the “spiritual.”

For more information, please see The CMP Interdisciplinary Lecture Series.

April 9, 2013
7:00 p.m. – Alumni Lounge, Nittany Lion Inn
IAH City Life/Living Cities Lecture Series: Globalization and the European City
Daniel L. Purdy, professor of German

April 9, 2013
12:00 p.m. – Room 7A, Sparks Building
IAH Resident Scholars and Artists Lecture Series: The Birth of Biopower 1.0: From Plants to Animals in Foucault
Jeffrey T. Nealon, Liberal Arts research professor of English and philosophy

Michel Foucault's late work of the 1980s has become a linchpin for examining "biopower," that contemporary regime where political power is increasingly exercised at the level of "life itself" (birth and death rates, access to health care, the politics of food, genetic engineering, lifestyle capitalism). This talk examines what you might call the first birth of biopower in Foucault's work – in 1966's The Order of Things, where Foucault provocatively insists that "life itself did not exist" before the dawn of the 19th century in Europe. Interestingly enough, as Animal Studies is one of the upshots of biopolitical thinking (why do our lives matter more than theirs?), Foucault's early account of biopower is nested within a discussion of plant life and animality, and their relationship to the biopolitics of human life.

This lecture is free and open to the public. A light lunch will be provided.

April 7, 2013
2:00 p.m. – The State Theatre
CMP Film Series: Amadeus
Charles Youmans, classical guitarist and professor of music history in the Penn State School of Music, introduces the film.

Amadeus (1984) is the incredible story of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart told in flashback by his peer and secret rival Antonio Salieri. The film was nominated for fifty-three awards and received forty, eight of them Academy Awards including best picture. It is the story of one of the world’s most famous composers as seen through the eyes of his enemy. The film, which has been called “an emotionally charged and tragic piece,” is ranked among the American Film Institute’s top 100 Best American Movies.

For more information and tickets, visit The CMP Film Series.

April 2, 2013
12:00 p.m. – Palmer Museum Lipcon Auditorium
IAH Resident Scholars and Artists Lecture Series: irregular activity
Helen O’Leary, professor of art

Helen O'Leary's artistic work is an effort to find the ‘back story’ of ‘uncertainty’ present in co-existing realities in Ireland. She draws from such epic stories and historical laments such as the Hag of Beara, the current Irish recession, psychics fairs, the egg thrower at Allied Irish banks, and Kerry babies, to name but a few. Through the language of paint, photograph, and text, O'Leary's work offers a glimpse into the irrational resistance and refusal still very present in the Irish psyche, and the ever-present humor necessary to human survival everywhere.

This lecture is free and open to the public. A light lunch will be provided.

April 1, 2013
7:00 p.m. – 112 Borland Building
CMP Salon Evening: Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra

The public is invited to a Salon Evening, An Artistic and Musical Tour of Five Magnificent Cities: Baroque Delft, Leipzig, London, Paris, and Venice, featuring Penn State faculty panelists Charlotte Houghton (art history), Nancy Locke (art history), Marica Tacconi (musicology), and Robin Thomas (art history). Journey through five European cities and learn about their master Baroque artists and composers: Johannes Vermeer, Canaletto, Antoine Watteau, Marin Marais, Johann Sebastian Bach, George Frideric Handel, and Antonio Vivaldi.

For more information, please see The Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra.

March 28, 2013
2:30 p.m. – Palmer Museum Lipcon Auditorium
CMP Interdisciplinary Lecture Series: Could Beethoven Dance?
Eric McKee, associate professor of music theory, Penn State

For more information, please see The CMP Interdisciplinary Lecture Series.

March 26, 2013
7:00 p.m. – HUB Auditorium
IAH City Life/Living Cities Lecture Series: Recalibrating Sustainability: Why Manhattan is Greener Than Vermont, and How Increasing Energy Efficiency May Make Our Climate Problems Worse
David Owen, staff writer for The New Yorker and author of Green Metropolis and The Conundrum

March 26, 2013
2:30 p.m. – Palmer Museum Lipcon Auditorium
CMP Interdisciplinary Lecture Series: The Persistence of Minuets in the Music of Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, and Schubert
Neal Zaslaw, the Herbert Gussman Professor of Music, Cornell University

At a time when the minuet was already more than a century old, it maintained a vigorous presence in musical pedagogy, composition, and performance, as well as in dance, literature, the visual arts, and certain socio-political arenas. This talk explores the nature of these peculiar survivals and investigates possible explanations for their persistence.

For more information, please see The Classical Music Project's Interdisciplinary Lecture Series.

March 24, 2013
2:00 p.m. –The State Theatre
CMP Film Series: Tous les Matins du Monde (All the Mornings of the World)
Marica Tacconi, professor of musicology in the Penn State School of Music, introduces the film.

Tous les Matins du Monde (1991), a French fictional film based on historical characters, focuses on the seventeenth- and early-eighteenth-century composer Marin Marais’ life as a musician, his mentor Monsieur de Sainte-Colombe, and Sainte-Colombe’s daughters. Director Alain Corneau adapts writer Pascal Quignard’s novel, a passionate and haunting story about the love of music and the apprenticeship of a famous viol player. The viol da gamba, a stringed instrument similar to a cello played by the instrument’s master Jordi Savall, is heard throughout the film and sets the mood for the story.

For more information and tickets, visit The CMP Film Series.

March 19, 2013
12:00 p.m. – Room 7A, Sparks Building
IAH Resident Scholars and Artists Lecture Series: The uses and abuses of material evidence: Religion at the origins of Islam

Jonathan Brockopp, associate professor of religious studies and history
Coins, tombstones, and tax receipts from Islam's first century (seventh century of the Christian Era) challenge some long-held presumptions about early Muslim society. These materials can be difficult to interpret, but they suggest that it took centuries for Islam to develop the hallmarks of a major religious tradition.

This lecture is free and open to the public. A light lunch will be provided.

March 12, 2013
7:30 p.m. – Eisenhower Auditorium
CMP Performance: Beethoven Orchestra Bonn

The all-Beethoven program at Penn State features the incomparable Symphony No. 5 in C minor. Louis Lortie joins the ensemble for the Piano Concerto No. 5 in E-flat Major.

For more information and tickets, please see Beethoven Orchestra Bonn on The CMP.

March 12, 2013
7:00 p.m. – Penn State Downtown Theatre Center
Clare Murphy: Traditional Irish Storytelling

March 12, 2013
3:00 p.m. – Music Building I’s Esber Recital Hall
CMP Master Class: Beethoven Orchestra Bonn

The public is invited to observe a two-hour master class featuring pianist Louis Lortie. Christopher Guzman, classical pianist and assistant professor of music at Penn State, leads the session.

For more information, please see Beethoven Orchestra Bonn on The CMP.

March 12, 2013
12:00 p.m. – Room 7A, Sparks Building
IAH Resident Scholars and Artists Lecture Series:
Under the Surface, Under the Skin: The Body and its Vital Force in Seventeenth-Century Spain
Nicolás Fernández-Medina, assistant professor of Spanish
How was the force of life understood and problematized in seventeenth-century Spain?  What were the broader conceptual frameworks that sustained new theories of life phenomena?  In the dark and bewildering tangle of medical debates that polarized the intellectual atmosphere in Spain in the closing decades of the seventeenth century, it was Juan de Cabriada’s Carta filosófica, médico-chymica (1687) that set forth a renovated and Europeanized epistemology of the body for the Spanish context.  Fernández-Medina will discuss how the young physician Cabriada announced a new corporeal hermeneutics capable of constructing bodily meaning beyond the vagaries of the soul and the obscurantism of Galenic theory.

This lecture is free and open to the public. A light lunch will be provided.

February 27, 2013
7:30 p.m. – Schwab Auditorium
CMP Performance: Brentano String Quartet

Brentano String Quartet, ensemble-in-residence at Princeton University, returns for the second season of the Center for the Performing Arts presentation of the complete string quartets by Ludwig van Beethoven. The program includes the quartets in G Major, Op. 18, No. 2; E-flat Major, Op. 74, Harp; and F Major, Op. 135.

For more information and tickets, please see Brentano String Quartet on The CMP.

February 26, 2013
7:00 p.m. – Borland Building, Room 112
IAH City Life/Living Cities Lecture Series: Less is Less: The Environmental Perils of Thinking Small
Daniel Willis, Professor of Architecture

Professor Willis will present research that is the subject of his forthcoming book, Architecture and Energy: Performance and Style. The research is part of the on-going Department of Energy-funded Energy Efficient Buildings Hub project, based at the Philadelphia Navy Yard. In the lecture he will argue that architects, by focusing on the performance of stand-alone buildings, have been thinking too narrowly, and that it makes no sense to speak of "sustainability" with reference to anything smaller than a geographic region organized around an urban core.

February 14, 2013
4:00 p.m. – Hetzel Lounge, Art Alley in HUB-Robeson Galleries
Symposium: In His Own Words: The Life and Work of César Chávez

In conjunction with the exhibition, the Center for Democratic Deliberation and the Institute for the Arts and Humanities are sponsoring a symposium on the contributions of Chávez to labor history and Latina/o culture featuring Dick Jensen (University of Nevada, Las Vegas), Josue David Cisneros (Northeastern University), Steve Martin (Ripon College), and Jill Jensen (Pennsylvania State University). After brief presentations by each of the four panelists, the moderator will lead an open discussion of Chávez’s significance and legacy.  All are invited to a reception following the program.

For more information, please contact Michael Hogan.

February 12, 2013
2:30 p.m. – Palmer Museum Lipcon Auditorium
CMP Interdisciplinary Lecture Series: Mozart’s Minuets
Eric McKee, associate professor of music theory, Penn State

For more information, please see The CMP Interdisciplinary Lecture Series.

February 5, 2013
2:30 p.m. – Palmer Museum Lipcon Auditorium
CMP Interdisciplinary Lecture Series: Beethoven in Hollywood
Michael Broyles, professor of musicology, Florida State University, and distinguished professor of music and professor of American history emeritus, Penn State

As the role of classical music has moved from representing a transcendent moral standard toward a seeming irrelevancy for many Americans, Beethoven remains one of the most recognizable figures in American culture. Far beyond the concert hall, his music and image appear in TV programs, commercials, magazine ads, radio, films, and other media. His presence extends to literature, plays, paintings, and sculpture. Focusing on the visual arts and popular music, this talk addresses how and why a European musician born more than 240 years ago sustains such a powerful presence in a society with increasingly varied roots.

For more information, please see The CMP Interdisciplinary Lecture Series.

February 5, 2013
12:00 p.m. – Room 7A, Sparks Building
IAH Junior Scholar in Early Modern Studies Lecture:
The Pietà di Palestrina: The Curious Case of an “Unfinished Work by the Celebrated Buonarroti”
Pierette Kulpa, Department of Art History
When an eighteenth-century bishop falsely attributed the Pietà di Palestrina to Michelangelo he altered the fate of the statue. Left conspicuously unfinished, the multi-figure group had been celebrated as a late masterpiece of Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564). This talk investigates what informed the Barberini family’s acquisition of the sculpture in 1660 in relation to the enduring devotion to Michelangelo in the century following his death. Kulpa will also discuss how the piece's various interpretations have informed notions of the art of Michelangelo himself.

February 4, 2013
7:30 p.m. – Biobehavioral Health Building, Room 022
Playing the Archive: Experiencing Data Through Visual and Sonic Immersion
Playing the Archive: Experiencing Data Through Visual and Sonic Immersion is an interdisciplinary event initiated by Studio|Lab, Penn State University. This year-long interdisciplinary project will be divided into two parts. The first is a week of intense workshops taking place at Studio|Lab between a core group of researchers from the College of Arts and Architecture and the College of Health and Human Development, with invited collaborators Simone Osthoff, Mark Ballora, and visiting percussionists Robyn Schulkowsky and Joey Baron. The week’s work will culminate in a public performance in the newly opened Bio Behavioral Health Building's Ruth Pike auditorium. The project group will prepare four archives (between 2,000 and 10,000 ‘documents’ each) for active and real-time sharing in different media and the creation of data-based, artistic visualizations (photo/video animation), sonifications (music), and eventually materializations (installation/sculpture). In addition, this first phase will be thoroughly documented from preparation, through the workshop, and to the final performance and exhibition. During the second phase of the project, the materials generated during the first phase will, throughout the year, continue to be discussed, evaluated, and edited with the goal of further generating cross-disciplinary research across the arts, the humanities, and the sciences.

For more information and tickets, visit Playing the Archive.

February 3, 2013
2:00 p.m. –The State Theatre
CMP Film Series: Immortal Beloved

Michael Broyles, professor of musicology at Florida State University, and distinguished professor of music and professor of American history emeritus at Penn State, introduces the film.
Immortal Beloved (1994) tells the life story of composer Ludwig van Beethoven and the mystery woman identified in private letters as his “immortal beloved.” Following Beethoven’s death, his secretary and first biographer Anton Schindler begins a journey to identify the mystery woman. It’s the tale of a man of genius, a woman of passion, and the mystery of a lifetime.

For more information and tickets, visit The CMP Film Series.

January 23, 2013
4:00 p.m. – Room 124, Sparks Building
Sacred Places: A Discussion of Art & Religion
Sponsored by the Institute for the Arts and Humanities, the Penn State Society for the Study of Religion presents these seminars as an opportunity to discuss current scholarly projects being undertaken by Penn State faculty and graduate students. All are welcome.

Featured panelists:

For more information, contact Jonathan Brockopp: 814-863-1338 or brockopp@psu.edu.

January 22, 2013
7:00 p.m. – Alumni Lounge, Nittany Lion Inn
IAH Cities of South Africa: Raymond Gastil, Visiting Professor and Chair in Design Innovation for the Stuckeman School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, Penn State
Raymond Gastil presents a lecture on Cape Town as part of the Cities of South Africa Lecture Series.

January 20, 2013
2:00 p.m. – The State Theatre
CMP Film Series: Thirty Two Short Films About Glenn Gould

Christopher Guzman, classical pianist and assistant professor of piano in the Penn State School of Music, introduces the film.

Thirty Two Short Films About Glenn Gould (1993) is an award-winning motion picture about piano prodigy Glenn Gould. It is a collection of vignettes each highlighting different aspects of the life, work, and character of the acclaimed Canadian classical pianist. From the director Francois Girard (The Red Violin), the film’s music consists almost entirely of piano recordings by Gould and includes works famously linked with him, such as Bach’s Goldberg Variations and the Well-Tempered Clavier.

For more information and tickets, visit The CMP Film Series.

January 18, 2013
7:30 p.m. – Schwab Auditorium
CMP Performance: Shuffle.Play.Listen

Shuffle.Play.Listen could have been titled “When Worlds Collide.” How else do you explain an album and performance in which Johann Sebastian Bach and Igor Stravinsky meet Radiohead and Arcade Fire?

Pianist Christopher O’Riley and cellist Matt Haimovitz work together to make this mix of classical and pop/alternative genres speak to audiences young and old. Both artists are known for breaking down barriers and have brought that spirit to the concert stage. In some instances, they even use social media to get audience input for choosing works to be played at concerts.

For more information and tickets, please see Shuffle.Play.Listen on The CMP.

January 16-February 24, 2013
HUB-Robeson Galleries
Exhibition: In His Own Words: The Life and Work of César Chávez

Featuring thirty-eight photographs paired with excerpts from his dynamic speeches, interviews, and authoritative writings, In His Own Words: The Life and Work of César Chávez documents the full course of Chávez’s remarkable career and examines the life experiences and philosophical influences that drove him to dedicate himself fully to improving the lives of American farm workers. 

For more information, please see In His Own Words: The Life and Work of César Chávez.

January 10, 2013
2:30 p.m. – Palmer Museum Lipcon Auditorium
Classical Music Project (CMP) Interdisciplinary Lecture Series: French Court Dancing
Eric McKee, associate professor of music theory, Penn State

Eric McKee joined the Penn State faculty in 1992 and teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in music theory. He received his doctorate from the University of Michigan, where he served as editor of the music theory journal In Theory Only. In addition to numerous presentations at national conferences in the United States, McKee has presented his research in England, Ireland, Germany, Poland, and Canada. His articles have appeared in various journals, including Music Theory SpectrumMusic AnalysisIn Theory Only, and Theory and Practice. McKee’s research projects have explored the musical depictions of death and spirituality in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century music, Schenkerian approaches to tonal form, phrase rhythm in the music of Mozart, and the minuets of Bach and Mozart. His current research, for which he was awarded a fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies, focuses on the influence of the dance in Chopin's music.

For more information, please see The CMP Interdisciplinary Lecture Series.

September 8, 2012, 7:30 p.m.
Eisenhower Auditorium
This Land is Your Land: The Woody Guthrie Centennial Celebration Concert

Folk music legend Woody Guthrie would have turned 100 this year. The Los Angeles-based GRAMMY Museum — in conjunction with Woody Guthrie Publications, the Woody Guthrie Archives, and Penn State — celebrates Guthrie’s extraordinary body of work and impact on American music with a tribute concert featuring a star-studded lineup. For more information, visit the Center for the Performing Arts.

September 29 – September 30, 2012
The State Theatre
Third Annual IAH Film Festival: College

October 3, 2012
Palmer Museum Lipcon Auditorium
African Poetry Reading with Patricia Jabbeh Wesley and Gabeba Baderoon

October 9, 2012
Charlotte Pierce-Baker, Ph.D., Reading/Discussion and Booksigning

Charlotte Pierce-Baker, Ph.D., is a professor of Women's and Gender Studies and in English at Vanderbilt University and the author of Surviving the Silence: Black Women’s Stories of Rape (Norton, 1998). At this event, she will discuss the topic of mental illness/bipolar disorder and do a reading from her newest book This Fragile Life: A Mother's Story of a Bipolar Son. For more infomation, including time and location when available, please visit the Africana Research Center Events Page.

October 12 - October 13, 2012
Life and Death of American Pastimes Conference

Thursday October 18, 2012 12:00 p.m.
Palmer Museum Lipcon Auditorium
Dorothy Driver, Professor of English at the University of Adelaide, will give a lecture on “Race and Feminism in South Africa”

This lecture examines literary texts as sites of dreaming in which unrealized visions of social harmony and individual autonomy—primarily in women’s writing—serve as antidotes to the historical forces that have produced South Africa’s nexus of race-class-gender oppressions. Looking at Olive Schreiner, Nadine Gordimer, Bessie Head, Zoë Wicomb and others, Driver's analysis addresses South African feminist thinking as it deals with the intersections of race, gender and class, sometimes reproducing a Western feminism but sometimes also introducing local inflections. Their fiction inscribes into the South African imaginary new forms of social interaction, thereby opening a route into Julia Kristeva’s revolutionary ‘women’s time’. Dreaming and writing become a powerful basis for change.

October 18, 2012
IAH Medal for Distinguished Achievement: J.M. Coetzee

October 23, 2012 6:00 p.m.–7:30 p.m.
Nittany Lion Inn, Board Room 1
Crain Soudien, Deputy Vice-Chancellor, University of Cape Town, will give the annual Mandela Lecture of the Africana Research Center.

November 6, 2012
12:00 p.m. – Room 7A, Sparks Building
Patricia Jabbeh Wesley presents “A Reading and Discussion of A Place Called Home: Memoirs of a Poet in the Liberian Civil War” as part of the Resident Scholar Lecture Series

Patricia Jabbeh Wesley will read excerpts from her memoir describing how her family lived through the Liberian civil war. During and after the reading, she will entertain questions from the audience about her experiences in the war, the memoir and her writing process.

November 9-10, 2012
The Pennsylvania State University
The Future of Graduate Education: A Summit on the Future of Graduate Programs in the Arts and Humanities

For more information, please contact Bill Doan (wjd13@psu.edu) or Michael Bérubé (mfb12@psu.edu).

November 13, 2012
12:00 p.m. – Room 7A, Sparks Building
Jonathan Eburne presents “So Dark, the Con of Man” as part of the Resident Scholar Lecture Series

Awash with secret revelations, encrypted meanings, and shocking trans-historical continuities, Dan Brown's 2003 bestseller, The Da Vinci Code, is a drama of the "Culture Wars" of the early 1990s. Its pulp-thriller adaptation of the medieval Grail romance draws not only from recent pseudo-historical works of "non-fiction" (such as the 1982 study Holy Blood,Holy Grail, itself based on earlier books from the 1960s), but also from literary-critical debates about the dangers of overinterpretation. Eburne's presentation will discuss the history and resonance of Dan Brown's ideas about "religious symbology," which his novel institutionalizes as the departmental affiliation of its protagonist, a Harvard University professor.

November 26, 2012 12:15 p.m.-1:30 p.m.
102 Kern Building
Gabeba Baderoon presents "The Sea Inside Us: Narrating Gender, Place and History in South African Memories of Pilgrimage" as part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series

November 27, 2012
12:00 p.m. – Room 7A, Sparks Building
Sophie de Schaepdrijver presents “Occupation Diaries as Moral Maps of the First World War” as part of the Resident Scholar Lecture Series

The First World War saw an explosion of private writing of all kinds – correspondence to and from the fronts, memoirs, and diaries. Private diaries, by men and women, soldiers and civilians, ‘amateurs’ or professional writers, first-time or lifelong diarists, abounded in all belligerent societies. Sophie de Schaepdrijver's research concentrates on diaries written by civilians under military occupation, another “front” of the war, and a locus both of confrontation and of cohabitation calling for an incessant questioning of what was at stake in this war. Such diaries, while replete with mundane detail, also fulfilled the task of morally “mapping out” the issues of the war and the diarist’s own position. These diaries were, then, incessant – and ultimately doomed – efforts to grapple with catastrophe.

November 27, 2012
7:00 p.m. – Alumni Lounge, Nittany Lion Inn
Imraan Coovadia, professor of English Language and Literature at the University of Cape Town, presents "Coetzee or Gordimer" as part of the Cities of South Africa Lecture Series.

December 3, 2012 6:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.
Foster Auditorium, Pattee/Paterno Library
Achille Mbembe, Research Professor of History and Politics, Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Witwatersrand, and Sarah Nuttall, Research Professor of English, University of Stellenbosch, will give a joint public lecture.

December 4, 2012
12:00 p.m. – Room 7A, Sparks Building
Nergis Erturk presents “Transl(iter)ating Communism, Baku 1926” as part of the Resident Scholar Lecture Series

Focusing on the 1926 Turcological Congress, an assembly of Turcologists in 1926 in Baku, Azerbaijan, Ertürk's talk will explore the contradictions inherent in the Leninist anti-colonial language politics of the early twentieth century. She will argue that the Baku Turcological Congress offers us an opportunity to examine the genealogies and legacies of “literary communism” outside western Europe.

December 11, 2012
7:00 p.m. – Alumni Lounge, Nittany Lion Inn
Kristin Barry, Ph.d. candidate in Art History at the Pennsylvania State University presents “First City of South Africa: Mapungubwe and the Architecture of the Limpopo Region” as part of the Cities of South Africa Lecture Series.

At the crux of the Shashe and Limpopo Rivers lies the enigmatic hill that is Mapungubwe. Inhabited as early as the 10th century CE, the settlement on and around Mapungubwe plateau can be considered South Africa’s first city, demonstrating social hierarchy and an adaptation to the landscape through sophisticated architectural design and planning. However, with gold archaeological finds rivaling those of Heinrich Schliemann’s hoard at Troy, the modern knowledge produced by the excavations at Mapungubwe is often overshadowed by colonial prejudice, political discord, and an ever-expanding cultural heritage debate.

2011-2012

September 8, 2011
9:00 a.m. – 124 Sparks Building
Colloquium on the public arts and humanities with Jan Cohen-Cruz, executive director of Imagining America: Artists and Scholars in Public Life

Jan Cohen-Cruz, Director of Imagining America: Artists and Scholars in Public Life, is a scholar, practitioner, and teacher of activist art. Her published works include Engaging Performance: Theatre as Call and Response, Local Acts: Community-Based Performance in the U S, and Radical Street Performance. On Thursday, September 8 at 9 a.m. in 124 Sparks Building, Cohen-Cruz will facilitate a group discussion with faculty, students, and artists interested in forming a response to the Marcellus Shale drilling. Results of this discussion will be presented on Friday, September 9 from 12:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. in the Alumni Lounge at the Nittany Lion Inn. Both events are free and open to the public. Imagining America Mission Statement: To animate and strengthen the public and civic purposes of humanities, arts and design through mutually beneficial campus-community partnerships that advance democratic scholarship and practice.

September 9, 2011
12:00 p.m. – Alumni Lounge, Nittany Lion Inn
Artists and Scholars in Public Life: Marcellus Shale

Jan Cohen-Cruz, Director of Imagining America: Artists and Scholars in Public Life, is a scholar, practitioner, and teacher of activist art. Her published works include Engaging Performance: Theatre as Call and Response, Local Acts: Community-Based Performance in the U S, and Radical Street Performance. On Thursday, September 8 at 9 a.m. in 124 Sparks Building, Cohen-Cruz will facilitate a group discussion with faculty, students, and artists interested in forming a response to the Marcellus Shale drilling. Results of this discussion will be presented on Friday, September 9 from 12:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. in the Alumni Lounge at the Nittany Lion Inn. Both events are free and open to the public. Imagining America Mission Statement: To animate and strengthen the public and civic purposes of humanities, arts and design through mutually beneficial campus-community partnerships that advance democratic scholarship and practice.

September 15, 2011
4:00 p.m. – Boardroom 1, Nittany Lion Inn
Rick Perlstein presents "When Austerity Was New: Ronald Reagan and the Proposition 1 Tax Limitation Initiative of 1973"

Politicians on all sides of the political spectrum now take it for granted that "austerity"—the need of government to rein in its spending—is imperative for national survival. Cutting taxes, or at least not raising them, is a major policy goal of Republicans, and something against which many Democrats have given up the fight. This lecture will demonstrate just how profound this ideological shift really was, through an examination of Governor Ronald Reagan's 1973 California state ballot initiative to cut taxes and cut government—which failed so badly pundits concluded that Reagan's relevance as a national figure was finished.

September 16, 2011
3:00 p.m. – HUB Auditorium
Collegiate Debate: Should the Welfare State Wither Away?

Collegiate political activists will debate following Rick Perlstein's lecture.

September 30 – October 2, 2011
The State Theatre
Second Annual IAH Film Festival: Workers of the World

Work has structured human societies from the beginnings of organized food production to the era of the cubicle and the webinar. Work is central to our place in nature and in culture: our relations to each other, and to the biosphere at large, determine and are determined by the kind of work we do. The nature and cultures of work have been transformed by successive phases of capitalism—mercantile, industrial, welfare-state, post-industrial; but the idea of work also informs the spiritual teachings of Buddhism, and underlies the precise, exacting disciplines of the performing arts. We’ve assembled sixteen terrific films about the world of work, ranging from the coal mines of West Virginia and the textile mills of Alabama to the wrestling rings of New Jersey and the noodle shops of Tokyo. Decades ago, workers organized and fought for your right to take some time off between Friday and Monday. Celebrate their historic victory: join us for a wonderful weekend– and join the workers of the world!.

October 3, 2011
7:30 p.m. – Alumni Lounge, Nittany Lion Inn
Workers of the World Film Festival Panel Discussion

Featuring Charles Dumas(Professor of Theatre and African American Studies), Kevin Hagopian (Sr. Lecturer in Communications Film-Video and Media Studies), Naomi McCormack (Assistant Professor of Communications Film-Video and Media Studies), Jennifer Rhee (IAH Postdoctoral Fellow), and Michelle Rodino-Colochino (Asst. Professor of Communications and Women’s Studies Film-Video and Media Studies).

October 4, 2011
7:00 p.m. (doors open at 6:45 p.m.)–Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
Cities: Rome–Screening of La Dolce Vita

In 2010-11, the Institute for the Arts and Humanities launched a new program focused on cities. Building on former IAH Director Marica Tacconi’s success with “Moments of Change,” the IAH has devised programming that appeals to audiences on campus and off; that allows for collaborative interdisciplinary exchange across the arts and humanities; and that highlights and publicizes the work of Penn State faculty and graduate students.

Rather than focusing chiefly on the present, or on cities in general (as many institutes’ recent work on cities has done), we want to delve into the deep history of individual cities in order to understand them as palimpsests of human activity.

We plan to offer three to five events each semester–events that explore the art, music, literature, history, politics, geography, and architecture of a city. We have chosen to focus on one city each year–a city whose importance to the world would appear to be self-evident, but rewards further investigation. In 2011-12, that city is Rome.

October 13, 2011
7:30 p.m. – Eisenhower Auditorium
IAH Medal for Distinguished Achievement: Paul Taylor

Paul Taylor is among the pantheon of artists (people such as Martha Graham, Doris Humphrey, and Merce Cunningham) who created America’s canon of modern dance. At every stage of his long and illustrious career, Mr. Taylor has won worldwide acclaim for the vibrancy, relevance, and power of his recent dances as well as his classics.

Taylor has earned a host of awards and commendations recognizing his accomplishments as a dancer, choreographer, and artistic director. Now he’s going to garner another honor. Taylor comes to Penn State to receive the Institute for the Arts and Humanities Medal for Distinguished Achievement. The award ceremony is scheduled to take place before the dance company’s performance.
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October 20–23, 2011
Nittany Lion Inn

The Society for Utopian Studies is holding its annual meeting at the Nittany Lion Inn from October 20-23. All session are held at the NLI, with the exception of a plenary session celebrating the Arthur O. Lewis Utopia Collection, housed in the Eberly Family Special Collections Library-the premiere collection of utopian texts and materials in the world. That session takes place in Foster Auditorium at 5:30 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 22.

The conference also features two visiting speakers generously supported by the IAH. The first is Lynn Book, Program for Creativity and Innovation with the Office of Entrepreneurship and Liberal Arts and Associate Professor of Theatre and Dance at Wake Forest University. For over twenty years Book has inspired students, professionals, businesses and institutions in a broad range of settings to venture new models of creative engagement and innovation, and her work often engages utopian ideas and practices. The second invited speaker is J Morgan Puett, co-director of Mildred's Lane, a 92+-acre experimental community in the upper Delaware River Valley region of Pennsylvania.

October 21, 2011–October 22, 2011
Carnegie Cinema (113 Carnegie Building)
David Lynch Film Festival

Nothing is what it seems: there are puffy-cheeked women singing under the radiator. There’s a severed ear in the grass, and it will lead you into a terrifying world you never knew your sleepy small town contained. There’s a strange man at the party who tells you he’s in your house–and sure enough, when you call home, he answers the phone even though he’s standing right in front of you. And there’s a mysterious cowboy in your room, and you may see him again–but are you dreaming?

Welcome to the hallucinatory worlds of David Lynch, America’s most acclaimed surrealist filmmaker. Yes, we know America doesn’t have all that many surrealist filmmakers– but that’s why Lynch’s work is so notable. Who else could have imagined the mutant baby of Eraserhead? Who else could have given us Blue Velvet, in which Kyle MacLachlan’s sane, sunny world gives way to the nightmare landscape of Dennis Hopper and Dean Stockwell? Who else could have composed Lost Highway and Mulholland Drive, with their Mobius-strip structures, their dreams-within-dreams, and their utterly inexplicable ruptures? And can you believe a major television network was loopy enough to give this guy a prime-time TV series? We only wish we could show Twin Peaks in its entirety....

Come join us for some of the most startling, bizarre, and provocative films ever to hit mainstream American cinema upside the head. The festival begins at 7:00 p.m. on Friday and 3:00 p.m. on Saturday; films will be shown at the Carnegie Cinema on campus (113 Carnegie Building), and admission is free and open to the public. Then on Monday, October 24, we will present two lectures by film scholar Todd McGowan, one at noon in 102 Kern and one at 7:00 p.m. in Foster Auditorium–also free and open to the public.
→RSVP via Facebook

October 24, 2011
12:30 p.m. – 102 Kern Building
Todd McGowan presents "David Lynch’s Material Girls."

October 24, 2011
7:00 p.m. – Foster Auditorium (inside Paterno/Pattee Library)
Todd McGowan presents "Capitalism in Crisis on Mulholland Drive."

October 24, 2011
4:00 p.m. – 102 Weaver Building

Heather S. Nathans presents her book, “Hideous Characters and Beautiful Pagans: Performing Jewish Identity in the Antebellum American Theatre.”

Nathans’s book explores how representations of Jewish characters in the antebellum theatre mirrored the treatment of Jewish Americans outside the playhouse. The wildly diverse types presented on stage reflected Jewish Americans’ struggles to establish themselves in the new nation, while still adhering to long-standing cultural and religious traditions.

The project integrates social, political and cultural histories, with an examination of those texts (dramatic and literary) that shaped the “stage Jew.” Nathans uses political cartoons, popular novels, portraiture, poetry, melodramas and burlesques to trace the shifting meanings and signifiers of “Jewishness” in America before the Civil War.

October 26, 2011
2:00 p.m. – Foster Auditorium (inside Paterno/Pattee Library)
Kathleen Fitzpatrick is the Director of Scholarly Communication at the Modern Language Association and one of the pioneers in the field of the digital humanities.

The final report from the July 2011 Scholarly Communication Institute makes clear that scholarly societies have a crucial role to play in creating a new, sustainable model for scholarly communication in the digital age. And yet many of these societies have long supported the services that they provide for their members through income generated from closed-access publications. In an age in which more and more scholarly communication is taking place on the open web, how can scholarly societies best help facilitate that work? How can those societies remain sustainable as their revenue models are increasingly replaced with a gift economy? What are scholars’ responsibilities with respect to their disciplinary organizations? And how can we work together to create a more open communication environment?

October 28, 2011
5:30 p.m. – Foster Auditorium (inside Paterno/Pattee Library)
Sexualities: M. Jacqui Alexander presents "A Queer Agenda for 2012 and Beyond?"

A lecture series devoted to exploring the difficult intersections of the disparate identities that constitute contemporary life–trans-racial, trans-gendered, trans-national.

November 1, 2011
3:00 p.m. – Foster Auditorium (inside Paterno/Pattee Library)
A lecture by John Edgar Wideman, IAH Distinguished Visiting Artist and two-time recipient of the International PEN/Faulkner Award

Acclaimed author of two dozen books of fiction and nonfiction, Pittsburgh-native John Edgar Wideman is the first author to have won the International PEN/Faulkner Award twice: for Sent for You Yesterday (1984) and for Philadelphia Fire (1990). He has won an O. Henry Award (2000), and has also received a MacArthur Prize and Lannan Literary Award. His nonfiction book Brothers and Keepers received a National Book Critics Circle nomination, and his memoir Fatheralong was a finalist for the national book award. In 1997 his novel The Cattle Killing won the James Fenimore Cooper Prize for Best Historical Fiction.

November 2, 2011
6:00 p.m. – Assembly Room, Nittany Lion Inn

Sylvia Tamale presents “Standing, Sitting and Sleeping: Unveiling the Politics of Sexuality in Africa” as part of the Sexualities Series

November 2, 2011
7:30 p.m. – Foster Auditorium (inside Paterno/Pattee Library)
A lecture by John Edgar Wideman, IAH Distinguished Visiting Artist and two-time recipient of the International PEN/Faulkner Award

Acclaimed author of two dozen books of fiction and nonfiction, Pittsburgh-native John Edgar Wideman is the first author to have won the International PEN/Faulkner Award twice: for Sent for You Yesterday (1984) and for Philadelphia Fire (1990). He has won an O. Henry Award (2000), and has also received a MacArthur Prize and Lannan Literary Award. His nonfiction book Brothers and Keepers received a National Book Critics Circle nomination, and his memoir Fatheralong was a finalist for the national book award. In 1997 his novel The Cattle Killing won the James Fenimore Cooper Prize for Best Historical Fiction.

November 3, 2011
8:45 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. – Alumni Lounge, Nittany Lion Inn

Frantz Fanon’s “The Wretched of the Earth: 50 Years Later” Symposium
The symposium will commemorate the publication of this text that has been so central to social and political movements and activism across the globe, as well as to colonial and post-colonial theory, Africana Studies, Africana philosophy, and Critical Philosophy of Race, Women’s and Gender Studies, among other areas of study connected to the humanities.

The speakers, Nigel Gibson, Rozena Maart, Mickaella Perina, and Lou Turner, will not only focus on the historical significance of Fanon’s Wretched, but will also examine the continued relevance of the text and how Fanon is being taken up today.

November 3, 2011
7:00 p.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
Rich Doyle presents “Stairway to Eleusis: The Exegesis Exegesis and the Dharma of Philip K. Dick” as part of the Resident Scholar Lecture Series

In its daily entries, diagrams and sketches, The Exegesis of Philip K. Dick documents a famed science fiction writer's eight-year attempt to fathom what he called "2-3-74," a post-modern visionary experience of the entire universe "transformed into information." Dick's experiences in February and March of 1974 with what he variously called VALIS, Firebright, Sophia and Zebra sent him on a classic visionary quest through the esoteric literatures and sciences of the planet as he focused his polymath sensibility, wide-raging erudition, and zen-like humor on a cosmic whodunnit: Who — or what — was VALIS? This talk will explore, re-enact and simulate some of Dick's newly published The Exegesis of Philip K. Dick, arguing that Dick's quest actively and creatively remixes the Greek Mysteries of Eleusis as he exhausts language and induces ego death in pursuit of a glimpse of reality. The talk argues that Dick's nearly nine thousand page text can be productively understood as "dharma" or instruction for creatively thriving through a planetary scale infoquake.

November 7, 2011
12:15 p.m. – 102 Kern Building
Marc Epprecht presents “Sexual Minorities and Erotic Justice in Africa: Issues and Challenges” as part of the Sexualities Series

November 8, 2011
7:00 p.m. – Alumni Lounge, Nittany Lion Inn
Michael Kulikowski presents “The Accidental Suicide of the Roman Empire” as part of the Cities: Rome lecture series

The Roman Empire fell. Everyone knows that. But why? Was it wave after wave of foreign invaders, the famous Germanic barbarians? Was it the moral decay of Roman society? Or did the empire really fall at all? Weren’t the early Middle Ages just a very late development of the Roman empire? Michael Kulikowski will explain how the very same political structures that kept the empire strong during after decades of crises during the third century also made that strength very brittle. No one wanted it to happen, but in the end the Roman Empire killed itself. Michael Kulikowski tells us how.

November 10, 2011
7:00 p.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
Sarah Rich presents “Making Awful Music Together: Jean Dubuffet and Asger Jorn’s Musical Collaborations” as part of the Resident Scholar Lecture Series

In 1961 French artist Jean Dubuffet and Danish Situationist Asger Jorn decided to have a jam session. Though both of them were known primarily as painters, they set their brushes aside and performed on instruments with which they had almost no experience: Bedouin oboes, Amazonian nasal flutes, Spanish castanets, a hurdy-gurdy, an accordion, and a host of other instruments for which there is no official nomenclature. Sarah Rich explores the implications of such a joint (and very noisy) venture: their transition from the visual to the aural, the implications of such transition for a collaborative enterprise (given that things like duets are common practice for the aural arts, unlike the visual arts which tend to emphasize individual activity) and the political implications of their conspicuously international set of instruments (all badly played).

November 14, 2011
12:15 p.m. – 102 Kern Building
Matt Richardson presents “Transgender and Race” as part of the Sexualities Series

Dr. Matt Richardson (UT’s Department of English, Department of African and African Diaspora Studies, Center for Women's and Gender Studies, and Center for African and African American Studies) is co-editor along with Leisa Meyer of this special issue of Feminist Studies. He will present and discuss parts of this collection. The issue engages visuality in film and performance, and explores what Transgender Studies can gain from a more thorough engagement with race and what work in critical race theory can gain from engaging transgender subjectivities.

November 15, 2011
12:00 p.m. – Foster Auditorium (inside Paterno/Pattee Library)
Matt Richardson presents “Mourning the Queer: Black Memory and Queer Erasures” as part of the Sexualities Series
Black queer people comprise the "constitutive outside" of what is understood, celebrated, and remembered about Blackness. This lecture considers the consequences of disremembering black queer people from the collective memory of the past. The richness and the complexity with which Black people have resisted dominant attempts to control the Black body, decry Black sexuality as aberrant, and to define Black families as pathological, is lost without the queer voice. If Black queer people are rejected as inauthentically Black and “un-African”––and we are disremembered and unrecognized by our own––then we will not be mourned by the collective. Through descriptions of recent cases of police brutality and mob violence, we will interrogate the implications of this erasure by examining the largely unknown cases of black queer people killed in the United States. This topic is particularly significant in light of the spate of recent suicides by queer youth.

November 17, 2011
7:00 p.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
David Witwer presents “The Acid Attack on Victor Riesel and Cold War America’s Mobilization Against Labor Racketeering” as part of the Resident Scholar Lecture Series

In 1956, an acid attack on the crusading journalist Victor Riesel left him blind for life and helped spur the creation of the largest ever congressional investigation into union corruption, the McClellan Committee hearings (1957-1959). Riesel had framed labor racketeering as a threat comparable in scale and kind to communist subversion and the response to this attack revealed the potency of this trope in Cold War America. But the incident also provided a convenient opening for particular interest groups in this era. The attack happened just as the U.S. labor movement had reached its all-time peak and anti-union groups were eager for an issue that would help them raise concerns about union power. At the same time, Republican Party leaders hoped for an issue that would draw working class voters away from the Democrats while maintaining the loyalty of the GOP’s base. David Witwer’s research draws on never before released FBI documents to offer a behind-the-scenes perspective on the attack and its aftermath, revealing ways in which the horrific incident was manipulated to serve particular ends.

December 1, 2011
7:00 p.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
Robert Caserio presents “ Modernism, Vedanta and Romance in World War II Fiction: Christopher
Isherwood, Aldous Huxley and W. Somerset Maugham” as part of the Resident Scholar Lecture Series

W. Somerset Maugham, Aldous Huxley, and Christopher Isherwood represent three generations of twentieth-century fiction-writing in Great Britain and the U. S. The work of the latter two writers is characterized by modernist literary aesthetics, yet all three figures have something in common. Despite their voluminous productivity, each shows an inclination to bring the novel as we know it to an end. Engagement with Vedantic philosophy lies behind their common impulse. The lecture will assess Vedanta ’s impact on the representation of everyday life that we associate with prose fiction, and will consider Vedanta’s potential for withering even the romance roots of the novelistic genre. At issue is a critical conflict between literary art and religious inspiration.

December 5, 2011
7:00 p.m. – Ballroom A/B, Nittany Lion Inn

Denise Costanzo presents “Why Rome? Architectural Pilgrims in the Eternally Redefined City” as part of the Cities: Rome Lecture Series

December 7, 2011
4:30 p.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
Actor Bill Irwin presents “A Comic’s Notebook”

January 26, 2012
6:30 p.m. – Carnegie Cinema (113 Carnegie Building)
French Film Series: Copie Conforme (Certified Copy)
Iranian master Abbas Kiarostami works in the West for the first time in this intriguing story about love and (mis)communication set in Tuscany. Playing with the question of what is fake versus what is authentic, Certified Copy opens with an English writer, James Miller, in Italy to promote the translation of his book, arguing that copies are just as good as “the real thing.” The following day, Miller joins an unnamed woman on a car trip to the small town of Lucignano. After a misunderstanding, Kiarostami’s film magically shifts, as Miller and the woman begin to take on different roles. Watching the two interact, we constantly wonder what the real nature of their relationship is: Are they really strangers? Are they trying to woo each other? In the process of figuring out the true connection of the couple onscreen, we may be left pondering what’s real and fake in our own relationships. 

Director: Abbas Kiarostami

February 3, 2012
3:30 p.m. – Room 151, Willard Building

Public Lecture, "The Nexus: Women, Religion, Race, and Civil Rights." Bettye Collier-Thomas, Professor of History, Temple University

February 6, 2012
12:00 p.m. – Room 124, Sparks Building

Leah Orr, IAH Early Modern Studies Junior Fellow, presents “Did the Novel Rise? Fiction in the Print Culture World of 18th-Century England”

February 7, 2012
7:00 p.m. – Alumni Lounge, Nittany Lion Inn

Garrett Fagan presents “Telling Time in the Eternal City” as part of the Cities: Rome Lecture Series

February 22, 2012
12:00 p.m.–1:30 p.m. Ihlseng Cottage

IAH Open House for PSU department heads, faculty, and graduate students

February 23, 2012
6:30 p.m. – Carnegie Cinema (113 Carnegie Building)
French Film Series: Un Homme Qui Crie (A Screaming Man)
Working on a scale both intimate (a father’s wounded ego) and epic (a nation torn apart by civil war), writer-director Mahamat-Saleh Haroun creates a remarkable portrait of present-day Chad. Adam, a 55-year-old former swimming champion, takes great pride in his work as the pool attendant at a luxury hotel in N’Djamena, the nation’s capital. His life is upended when his boss tells him that his son will be replacing him as the sole pool attendant. Reeling from this blow to his self-worth, Adam makes a treacherous decision. Adam gets his cherished job back, but the joy it provides is no match for the guilt and torment he now must endure.

Director: Mahamat-Saleh Haroun

March 13, 2012
7:00 p.m. – Alumni Lounge, Nittany Lion Inn

Brian Curran presents “The Colonna Crocodile and Other Tales of Egyptian Rome” as part of the Cities: Rome Lecture Series
In this talk, Prof. Curran will explore some of the less familiar denizens and domains of "Egyptian Rome," including some of the remarkable careers of a host of Egyptian animal sculptures: Sphinxes, lions, baboons, and a previously overlooked crocodile. In the process, he will reveal some of the unexpected ways that the legacy of ancient Egypt was preserved, interpreted, and appropriated in Rome, from the time of Augustus to the present day.

March 20, 2012
7:00 p.m. – Boardroom 1, Nittany Lion Inn

Mary Frances Berry presents “Achieving Justice in the Obama Era?” as part of the Barbara Jordan Lecture Series. Book signing begins at 5:00.

March 22, 2012
4:30 p.m. – 117 Auditorium, HUB-Robeson Center

“A conversation with Peter Schjeldahl,” chief art critic for The New Yorker
Peter Schjeldahl’s remarkable observations and commentary on art, artists, and exhibitions have earned him a prominent place in the world of contemporary art criticism. A staff writer at The New Yorker magazine since 1998 as well as a published poet, he will share his thoughts on the art world in this conversation with students, faculty, staff, and the community. Co-sponsored by the Palmer Museum, School of Visual Arts John M. Anderson Endowed Lecture Series, Institute for the Arts and Humanities, and Department of Art History.

March 29, 2012
12:00 p.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
Debra Hawhee presents “Bestial Rhetorics: Animals, Language, and Humans” as part of the Resident Scholar Lecture Series

The fables of Aesop are most associated with moral lessons: don’t be lazy or complacent like the hare, or you may lose to the slow-but-steady tortoise. But positioning these same fables within the rhetorical tradition can draw out a different set of lessons that accompany (and sometimes conflict with) those moral lessons. What can mice and donkeys teach us about speaking and writing? A lot, it turns out.  And those rhetorical lessons also reveal a good deal about the relationships between ancient humans and nonhumans, about encountering difference, and about learning more generally. 

March 29, 2012
6:30 p.m. – Carnegie Cinema (113 Carnegie Building)
French Film Series: Hadewijch
Bruno Dumont’s exceptional film about faith and religious fervor begins as devout 20-year- old Céline is expelled from a nunnery, the mother superior—who calls her a “caricature of a nun”—disapproving of her self-starvation and self-mortification. Returned to the secular world, we discover she is the child of a French cabinet minister and lives in a palatial Paris apartment. Our heroine soon meets two brothers, Yassir and Nassir. The latter recognizes her religious seriousness and invites her to the Koran discussion group he leads. Although she doesn’t convert to Islam, Céline becomes fascinated by Nassir’s intense theological debates and his support of jihad. Dumont’s powerful film, which takes its title from the name of a 13th-century poet, Hadewijch of Antwerp, profoundly explores the relentless pursuit of faith in both Christianity and Islam—and what drives certain believers to acts of extreme violence.

April 3, 2012
10:00 a.m. – 121 Borland Building)
Breakfast and conversation with Penn State School of Visual Arts director Graeme Sullivan, about the role of art schools in higher education.
RSVP to adc5229@psu.edu.

April 3, 2012
6:00 p.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
IAH Distinguished Visiting Professor Bruce W. Ferguson presents “The Word is Coming to an End”
Issues of literacy and post literacy in an environment of proliferating images and virtual technology will be discussed.

April 3, 2012
7:00 p.m. – Alumni Lounge, Nittany Lion Inn

Marica Tacconi presents “When in Rome, Compose Like the Romans: Music in the Eternal City at the Time of the Counter-Reformation and Beyond” as part of the Cities: Rome Lecture Series

April 4, 2012
2:30 p.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
IAH Distinguished Visiting Professor Bruce W. Ferguson presents “Not in the Age of the Pharaohs”
A lecture on pre-revolutionary Egyptian art.

April 5, 2012
2:30 p.m. – Foster Auditorium (inside Paterno/Pattee Library)
IAH Distinguished Visiting Professor Bruce W. Ferguson presents “The Catalogue is Out”
A lecture on the role of the catalog in art exhibitions.

April 10-20, 2012
The Secret Life of Public Spaces
The Secret Life of Public Spaces is a multi-disciplinary, action-research project to invigorate public space. Public space is the theatre of everyday life; on its stage we engage with the environment, culture and citizenship. Everyday patterns often slip into invisibility and are lost to mindful engagement. The Secret Life of Public Spaces proposes that a rediscovery of movement (people), topography (space), and devices (objects), based on inquiry and performance will reveal and recast the everyday dynamics of public spaces.

April 10-21, 2012
Playhouse Theatre, Theatre Building)
Penn State Center Stage presents GIZMO, a new play by Anthony Clarvoe
For tickets and additional information, please contact the Center for the Performing Arts at 814-863-0255 or 800-ARTS-TIX.

April 12, 2012
12:00 p.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
Erin Murphy presents “Ancilla: A Reading of Original Poetry” as part of the Resident Scholar Lecture Series

This reading features poems voiced by historical figures who played ancillary roles in the lives of well-known writers, artists, musicians, scientists, and philosophers. Ultimately, the poems in “Ancilla” address issues fundamental to feminist studies, such as gender roles, subservience, and power.

April 13, 2012
9:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. – Palmer Museum of Art Plaza, Palmer Museum of Art
Collaborative Creative Resistance

Collaborative Creative Resistance is a workday-long public performance led by B Stephen Carpenter II, professor of art education at Penn State, with assistance from members of reservoir studio. The performance is a form of public pedagogy in response to the global water crisis. Carpenter has conducted similar performances at universities in Texas and California. Using clay, sawdust, colloidal silver, and a ram press, the performance seeks to demonstrate the production of ceramic water filters made of clay and sawdust. In addition, a temporary exhibition of ceramic water receptacles created by Penn State School of Visual Art students will be on display. Visitors will learn about the global water crisis and the production of affordable approaches to render bacteria-contaminated water potable.

The performance is supported by an Individual Faculty Grant from the Institute for the Arts and Humanities at Penn State, reservoir studio, Humanitarian Engineering and Social Entrepreneurship Program, the School of Visual Arts, and the College of Arts and Architecture.

The event is free and the public is encouraged to attend.
→RSVP via Facebook

April 13-15, 2012
116, Theatre Building
Robot Weekend: Being Human Gizmos
This innovative IAH symposium begins with the opening night performance of Anthony Clarvoe’s new play Gizmo, which is inspired by Karel Capek’s R.U.R. (Rossum’s Universal Robots) – the play that introduced the word "robot" (worker) for the first time.

Then on Saturday, April 14 and Sunday, April 15 we’ll hold a series of conversations about the boundaries of the human, with regard to artificial intelligence, animals, disability, and bioethics. Topics will range from worms to zombies to the history of consciousness, so quite literally, there should be something for everyone. And at the center of the conference, at noon on Saturday, Anthony Clarvoe will lead a lunch session on his play, just before the 2:00 p.m. matinee. Come join us for a weekend of being humans and playing with robots!

The symposium is free and open to the public, but please register at http://www.iah.psu.edu/programs/robotweekend.shtml.

Tickets for Gizmo are available through the Penn State School of Theatre.

April 17, 2012
4:30 p.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
Erika Doss presents “Picturing New Deal America: Visual Art and National Identity, 1933-1945” as part of the American Art Lecture Series

Noted art historian Erika Doss will survey a variety of visual arts produced in the United States under the auspices of a variety of New Deal federal art programs, wherein artists were employed for the purpose of creating significant, lasting public artworks in schools, hospitals, and libraries. She will examine, by way of visual culture, issues of citizenship and the dynamics of national identity during the Great Depression. Co-sponsored by the Palmer Museum, Institute for the Arts and Humanities, and the Department of Art History.

April 19, 2012
12:00 p.m. – Palmer Lipcon Auditorium, Palmer Museum of Art
Taylor Greer presents “Peacocks and Pleasure-Domes: The Rebirth of the Pastoral in Charles Griffes's Music” as part of the Resident Scholar Lecture Series

In the songs and tone poems that American composer Charles Griffes wrote between 1915-19 the breadth of his exoticism is breathtaking, including French, Celtic, and Japanese idioms. The thread linking these diverse works is that in all of them he revives and yet transforms the pastoral genre, uniting literary and musical traditions. In my lecture I propose a new interpretive foundation for Griffes’s style of exoticism within the context of a semiotic theory of musical expression. Excerpts from two of his most famous works will be discussed: “The White Peacock” and “The Pleasure-Dome of Kubla Khan.”

April 19, 2012
7:30 p.m. – Eisenhower Auditorium
Diavolo, a dance company under the artistic direction of Jacques Heim.

For tickets and additional information, please contact the Center for the Performing Arts at 814-863-0255 or 800-ARTS-TIX.